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RED OR GREEN?

LAS CRUCES — It may not be from New Mexico originally, but it has made quite an impression since it arrived.

Chile is the subject of a fun and educational exhibit created at the New Mexico Farm & Ranch Museum in Las Cruces in 2010. Titled “Red or Green?” The Origins and Cultural Significance of the Chile Pepper in New Mexico, the exhibit was also displayed in the Governor’s Gallery at the New Mexico State Capitol in Santa Fe for five months beginning in December 2012. The exhibit’s next stop will be at The Raton Museum in Raton, New Mexico, where it will be on display beginning in July 2015.

The fun and educational exhibit focuses on New Mexico chile varieties, their history and evolution, and how they came to have such a central place in the state’s culture.

“A major theme of the exhibit is how chile became such an integral part of New Mexico without being native,” said Cameron Saffell, formerly the historian for the Museum and a curator of the exhibit. “It’s a part of three state symbols, there are festivals all over the state, and now we have the state’s Green Chile Cheeseburger Trail.”

The state Legislature named the chile as a state vegetable in 1965 and designated Red or Green?” as the state question in 1996, in reference to whether you prefer red or green chile on your food.

The exhibit traces the origins of the chile and how the Spanish brought the plant to the American Southwest in the early 1600s. It features the emergence of regional production centers such as Hatch and Chimayo, and the development of specific varieties by researchers such as Fabian Garcia at New Mexico A&MA College in the early 1900s.

Following the historical section, the exhibit focuses on how the chile became a key component of New Mexico culture – both as a cuisine and as a symbol.

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THE GATE CITY

RATON, NEW MEXICO “THE GATE CITY”

Protected on three sides by mountains, Raton is cradled by Mother Nature herself in beauty, freshness and simplicity that time cannot erase.  It has a heritage that lifts the heads of its inhabitants even above the lofty mountain peaks.  It is indeed “The Gate City”.

 Father Stanley

Published in the “THE LAND OF SUNSHINE “(1904)

FOR THE TOURIST

Tourists are welcomed.  New Mexico has superb mountain scenery, quiet and picturesque valleys, unparalleled historic and prehistoric attractions.  It is the land of the Cliff Dwellers; of the Pueblo Indians; of the Indian dances; of the Conquistadores; of towns and buildings older than the oldest historic monuments of any other part of the United States; of the scenery grand and unique; and to the sportsman it offers good hunting and excellent fishing.

Published in the “THE LAND OF SUNSHINE “(1904)

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75th Anniversary Level Membership Reception

Join us on May 3rd at 2:00pm for a special private reception and viewing of The Raton Museum newest acquisitions. The Board will also unveil details about exciting upcoming events. This event is for all 75th Anniversary Level Members to attend. To become a 75th Anniversary Level Member all you need is to pay a membership fee of $75.00. Current Museum members can upgrade your membership to the 75th Anniversary Level for only $45.00. For more information please contact the Museum.

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THIS TUMBLEWEED LANDED: By Larada Horner-Miller

THIS TUMBLEWEED LANDED:

By Larada Horner-Miller Illustrated by: J.R. Gilstrap

The Raton Museum will host a presentation by author Larada Horner-Miller and a book signing of “This Tumbleweed Landed” on Thursday, April 16th at 2PM.

Growing up as a member of a ranching family in Branson, a small town in southeastern Colorado, provided author Larada Horner-Miller a treasure-trove of stories, characters, and emotional moments that make up her touching memoir, This Tumbleweed Landed. This collection of poems and prose transports readers back to rural America during the fifties and sixties, to one idyllic, tight-knit community in particular. Each of the book’s eight sections weaves a nostalgic yarn that tells of playtimes with friends and neighbors, favorite hiding places, living without a telephone for the first eleven years of life, and the touching memories of growing up in a ranching community. Whether it is Saturday night dances or hot days working with 4-H at the county fair, the poems and pages roll along like a tumbleweed in search of a place to land. Readers will find themselves longing to go back to this very specific time and place, whether they actually experienced it in their own lives or not.

Read about this daddy’s little girl and her adventures that mold and shape her formative years. Where will this tumbleweed land, and what kind of woman will she be when she finally arrives?

Book Cover

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GET CONNECTED……

THE RATON MUSEUM IS PROUD TO ANNOUNCE:

GET CONNECTED……

BACA VALLEY TELEPHONE…. SPONSOR OF A WIRELESS HOT SPOT!

Located within The Raton Museum;  The internet access is for the convenience of visitors to the Historic District, and the Museum patrons. The Raton Museum wants to thank Baca Valley Telephone & Sierra Communications for their generous sponsorship. Together the Museum and Baca Valley will diffuse the awareness of the art, history and culture of Raton and Northeastern New Mexico.

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Roger That! THE CITY OF BETHLEHEM

DID YOU KNOW?

For the past 68 years the Raton Lions Club has braved the elements and climbed the hills in Climax Canyon to put up the “City of Bethlehem” display for all to see.

Originally started as a small Nativity scene placed on the Court House lawn in 1946. The praise and response to this small scene was so great that in 1947 a large Nativity scene was constructed and erected in Climax Canyon and displayed by flood lights. By 1948 additional scenes were constructed and set up in the canyon. The “City of Bethlehem” now consists of eighteen different sequence sets and is lighted annually each night through New Year’s and is viewed by thousands of people each year.

The City of Bethlehem in Climax Canyon

WHAT IS ROGER THAT?

Roger Sanchez has been apart of the Raton Museum family for over 20 years. His knowledge of Raton, Colfax County and the surrounding area has been a great asset to not only The Raton Museum but also to the thousands of visitors he has greeted at the Museum over the years.

Roger wants to share more of his knowledge with you! “ROGER THAT” is a series of posts featuring fun facts, history and trivia about Raton and the surrounding area. Please check back for new installments of ROGER THAT!

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BOOK SIGNING AND PRESENTATION

Porter and Ike Stockton: Colorado and New Mexico Border Outlaws

by Michael R. Maddox

PLEASE JOIN THE RATON MUSEUM IN WELCOMING AUTHOR MICHAEL R. MADDOX ON FEBRUARY 6, 2015 FOR A BOOK SIGNING AND PRESENTATION.

This is the first book which tells the full story of Porter and Ike Stockton and the turmoil which resulted in their violent deaths nine months and forty miles apart in the Animas River valley of northwest New Mexico and southwest Colorado in 1881. Before that happened the brothers lived in Colfax County, where Porter Stockton was indicted for three murders. One of those murders was witnessed by Doc Holliday. This fact has never been published elsewhere. This is a 530 page book which includes two chapters dealing almost exclusively with events in Colfax County during the 1870s. The book includes previously unpublished information about the early history Cimarron, the hell on wheels railroad camp of Otero and other areas of Colfax County. It also describes the establishment of the cattle industry in Colfax County. My presentation will focus heavily on the early cattlemen and cowboys of Colfax County.

The book — Publisher – Michael R. Maddox – Date of Publication – May 14, 2014, softcover, 530 pages, Non-fiction with endnotes, a bibliography, an index and over 70 illustrations, photos and maps, retail price is $24.95. The book is available on Amazon and can also be purchased at bookstores and museums in Farmington, Aztec and Albuquerque and in Durango, Colorado.

The author – Mike Maddox grew up in Farmington and Santa Fe. He attended New Mexico State University and graduated from Colorado State University. He is retired from the New Mexico State Parks. He and his wife Pam live near Farmington. The research and writing of the book encompassed six years and included numerous trips to university archives, museums and county courthouses in New Mexico, Colorado and Texas (including trips to Cimarron, Raton and Trinidad).

“This book rattles with blood and thunder between the lines…” Porter and Ike Stockton: Colorado and New Mexico Border Outlaws by Michael R. Maddox as reviewed in the December 2014 issue of True West magazine.

True West Magazine Cover

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ROGER THAT! THE USS RATON (SS-270)

USS RATON (SS-270) THE MIGHTY MICK

DID YOU KNOW?

The USS RATON (SS/SSR/AGSS-270), a Gato-class submarine, was a ship of the United States Navy named for the raton, a polynemoid fish inhabiting semitropical waters off the Pacific coast of America.

Raton (SS-270) 1943-1948 Attack Submarine

The Raton SS-270 was laid down May 29, 1942 by Manitowoc Shipbuilding Co., Manitowoc, Wisc.; launched January 24, 1943; sponsored by Mrs. C.C. West and commissioned July 13, 1943, Lt. Comdr. J.W. Davis in command.  Following training in Lake Michigan and at Coco Solo, C.Z.; Raton sailed for the southwest Pacific September 19, 1943, and upon arriving at Brisbane, Australia, on October 16, joined Submarine Force, 7th Fleet.

USS RATONRaton (SSR-270) 1953-1959 Radar Picket Submarine

After being placed in reserve in the fall of 1948, Raton was decommissioned at New London, Conn., on March 11, 1949.  She remained in the Atlantic Reserve Fleet at New London until July 1952 when she was towed to Philadelphia Naval Shipyard for conversion to a radar picket submarine.  Redeisgnated SSR-270 on July 18, 1952, Cmdr. J.K. Wills in command, Raton underwent training for several months prior to being ordered to the Pacific where she spent the next year in local operations, before departing from San Diego on May 11, 1955 for a 6 month deployment to WestPac.  Raton then was assigned for her second 7th Fleet deployment, May 1957 training in exercises off the Pacific Coast.  After overhaul the submarine deployed to the 7th Fleet yet another time from March 1959 to November 1959, participating in operations with SEATO and the Japanese Maritime Self-Defense Force.

Raton (AGSS-270) 1960-1968 Auxiliary Submarine

Raton sailed west for her fourth 7th Fleet deployment in July 1961, returning to Sand Diego in December, where she engaged in fleet training operations off the west coast of the United States, providing services for air, surface, and submarine forces.   In 1966 Raton once more followed the setting sun for another tour of duty with the 7th Fleet.  While deployed, Raton exercised with SEATO naval units in Exercise “Sea Imp”.  Her final years were spent in local operations, reserve training, and as a test ship.  Raton was decommissioned at Mare Island Naval Shipyard and stricken from the Navy List June 28, 1969.

 

RATON was awarded six battle stars for service in World War II.

The insignia was worn on fatigues and off duty jackets by the crew of the “Raton”.

 

WHAT IS ROGER THAT?

Roger Sanchez has been apart of the Raton Museum family for over 20 years. His knowledge of Raton, Colfax County and the surrounding area has been a great asset to not only The Raton Museum but also to the thousands of visitors he has greeted at the Museum over the years.

Roger wants to share more of his knowledge with you! “ROGER THAT” is a series of posts featuring fun facts, history and trivia about Raton and the surrounding area. Please check back for new installments of ROGER THAT!

 

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Before Bataan: New Mexico’s 200th Coast Artillery

Before Bataan: New Mexico’s 200th Coast Artillery

An outreach exhibit at The Raton Museum

Santa Fe—In August 1940, talk of war swirled around Camp Luna near Las Vegas, N.M. The 1,800 men of New Mexico’s 200th Coast Artillery Regiment gathered there to train one last time on home soil before heading to the Philippines. A photographer was there, capturing images of youth and dedication, young men unaware of the ordeals they would soon face.

On Nov. 1 through Nov. 22, the Palace of the Governors Photo Archives will mount a special exhibition at The Raton Museum featuring 10 of those images. The exhibit represents a collaboration between the museum and the New Mexico History Museum’s Palace of the Governors Photo Archives. Before Bataan: New Mexico’s 200th Coast Artillery is open for viewing between 10am and 4pm; Wed. through Sat.; The Raton Museum is located at 108 South Second St., in Raton’s historic district.

As part of the exhibit, the Museum will be displaying the Annual Wall of Hero’s Exhibit;

honoring area Veterans and those currently serving in the armed forces.  The Raton Museum will also join the Raton Parks & Recreation Board by hosting a reception following the dedication of the new Veteran’s Park on Nov. 11, 2014.

The 200th Coast Artillery held 1,816 New Mexicans, many of them fluent in Spanish. That skill inspired military leaders to deploy them to the Philippines in September 1941, before the war began. Along with Filipino troops, they were defending the Bataan peninsula when it fell to the Japanese military in April 1942. During the Bataan Death March and their subsequent imprisonment, 829 men from the regiment died or were missing. A third of the survivors died within a year from injuries or disease.

“For some time I have wanted to exhibit or show the behind-the-scenes photographs of the 200th Coast Artillery in Las Vegas before going into action,” said Daniel Kosharek, photo curator at the History Museum. “We all know the story of Bataan. These photographs show the young men of New Mexico before they are sent into that horrendous situation. Many of them did not come back.”

The Raton Museum is honored and delighted to have been selected to display this series of photographs; which are part of the New Mexico Magazine Collection; collaborating with the New Mexico History Museum and the Palace of the Governor’s Photo Archives allows the Raton Museum to present to the public a rare aspect of New Mexican history.

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Roger That! THE RAILROAD

DID YOU KNOW?

Raton was once home to 3 Railroad companies. Each having a depot located here.

ASTF

SF Raton & Eastern Railway

St. Louis Rocky Mountain Pacific Railroad

At the Height of the Railroad as many as 65 trains ran per day.

Railroads

 WHAT IS ROGER THAT?

Roger Sanchez has been apart of the Raton Museum family for over 20 years. His knowledge of Raton, Colfax County and the surrounding area has been a great asset to not only The Raton Museum but also to the thousands of visitors he has greeted at the Museum over the years.

Roger wants to share more of his knowledge with you! “ROGER THAT” is a series of posts featuring fun facts, history and trivia about Raton and the surrounding area. Please check back for new installments of ROGER THAT!

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Roger That! Dawson, New Mexico

DID YOU KNOW?

On October 22, 1913, 263 miners were killed in an explosion. And then again on February 8, 1923 another Dawson mine explosion killed 123 miners.

Former Dawson residents, their descendants and friends attend a biennial reunion at the Dawson Cemetery over the Labor Day Weekend. The 2014 Dawson Reunion will be held on Saturday and Sunday August 30th and 31st.

Dawson, New Mexico

WHAT IS ROGER THAT?

Roger Sanchez has been apart of the Raton Museum family for over 20 years. His knowledge of Raton, Colfax County and the surrounding area has been a great asset to not only The Raton Museum but also to the thousands of visitors he has greeted at the Museum over the years.

Roger wants to share more of his knowledge with you! “ROGER THAT” is a series of posts featuring fun facts, history and trivia about Raton and the surrounding area. Please check back for new installments of ROGER THAT!

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BECOME INVOLVED

HELP PRESERVE THE PAST…

The Raton Museum is a non profit organization, therefore we rely on the support from the community and the generosity from people like you. There are many different ways to become involved with The Raton Museum and not all of them necessarily require a monetary contribution. Below is a list of ways and information on how you can become involved with The Raton Museum.  All contributions to the Museum are tax-deductible to the extent that the law allows.

 

GIVE A GIFT

All and any dollar amount donations are greatly appreciated and are needed to help operate The Raton Museum. Your monetary donation will go directly to the daily operation of the Museum, pay for utilities, upgrades to the facility, the purchase and restoration of artifacts, exhibits/guest speakers and much much more. You can drop off donations directly to the Museum (located on South Second Street in Raton). You can also mail donations to the address below. Please call the Museum if you have any questions at  575-445-8979.

The Raton Museum 108 South Second Street Raton, New Mexico 87740

 

VOLUNTEER

The Raton Museum is always in need of volunteers to help around the Museum. Whether it be just looking after the front desk while a staff member gives a guided tour, helping set up exhibits or just helping the Museum with day to day operations. Regardless of what we have you doing we strive to put all our volunteers in positions that they are comfortable in and enjoy. If you are interested in becoming a volunteer or have any questions please contact us at 575-445-8979 or please feel free to email us. We will be happy to answer any all questions or concerns you may have about volunteering.

 

BECOME A MEMBER

Become apart of the strong foundation that the Raton Museum is built upon. Help support the Museum, get involved and sign up to be a member today! Membership dues are $30.00 annually and are 100% tax-deductible. Call, email or stop by the Museum to sign up to become a member.

 

ARTIFACT DONATION/ON LOAN

Do you own a piece of history? Do you want to share that history with the community and the thousands of visitors that come through the Museum’s doors every year? At the Museum we are always happy to accept any historically significant items that you or your family may have. Please contact the Museum to arrange a donation today.

Honor love ones by donating to the Raton Museum. Ask us about our Memorial Gift Program and donate to the Museum in someone’s honor! The Museum proudly preserves the name of honoree and donor in Memorial books that are on public display for all visitors.

 

THE LAIRD PRIVATE FOUNDATION

Renovations and refreshing of the Raton Museum is taking place in 2014 and we request your patience during this process.

The Board of Trustees want to take this opportunity to thank THE LAIRD PRIVATE FOUNDATION for their commitment to preserving Raton’s history and culture through a generous grant for the renovation of The Raton Museum.

The LAIRD PRIVATE FOUNDATION was established for the charitable, literary, educational and cultural benefit of Raton and the cultural improvement of the residents of the City of Raton, NM; The Raton Museum was established to increase and diffuse knowledge and appreciation of all cultural subjects and to that end to establish and maintain in the City of Raton, NM, a museum to collect and preserve objects of cultural history…  Together The Laird Private Foundation and The Raton Museum has ensured that Raton’s diverse culture and history will be available to future generations.

 


The Raton Museum is a not-for-profit 501(c)(3) tax exempt organization under the IRS Code, sections 509(a)(1) and 170(b)(1)(A)(vi) and as such contributions are deductible as described therein.
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DISCOVER THE MUSEUM

The Raton Museum has continued to provide residents of the City of Raton and the traveling public with a year round venue offering art, history and research facilities. The Raton Museum continues to be the leading organization for the collection, management, maintenance, and preservation of historically significant artifacts.  Our historic walking tour brochure has been a favorite resource for tourists when visiting our historic district.

IT IS IMPORTANT TO REMEMBER THAT CULTURAL TOURISM IS ABOUT THE REAL EXPERIENCE; ALLOWING THE PUBLIC TO SLOW DOWN, TO INTERACT AND LEARN ABOUT OUR HISTORY.

And to that point;
Within the Raton Museum walls is the story of our rich and exciting past.  Stories such as that of the early travelers, trappers, traders; a story of pioneers settling the west, expansive ranches, the battle between railroads for access to larger markets, the development of mining within the region and stories of people who helped to sculpt the rich and diverse culture of our community.

The Museum’s goals are to preserve history and culture by collecting, preserving, and presenting documents, photographs, tools, clothing, artworks, and other artifacts that played a role in the ongoing story of Raton and Colfax County.  The collection consists of Indian artifacts, history of the Wooten Toll Road and the Clifton House, along with items found along the Santa Fe Trail.  Photographs and artifacts record life of Colfax County’s early farming and ranching communities.  The Raton Museum has an extensive railroad exhibit and is a must for railroad buffs.  Artifacts and photographs from many coal camps represent a significant part of Raton’s history and contributed to the cultural diversity of our community.  An annual Veteran’s exhibit features military uniforms and artifacts, and a history of the roles played by citizens during their service in the armed forces.  The Raton Museum’s extensive photograph collection continues to grow through the generous contributions of patrons and serves as a valuable resource for research, education, and presentation of programs on regional history and personalities.

Located on the Old Santa Fe Trail; in the heart of Raton’s historic district sits the 100 year-old building that was purchased and renovated with the generosity and support of the community.  The Raton Museum is approached by numerous state museums and other program developers to participate and host exhibits and programs which broadens our image and brings further recognition to our community and The Raton Museum.

 


The Raton Museum is a not-for-profit 501(c)(3) tax exempt organization under the IRS Code, sections 509(a)(1) and 170(b)(1)(A)(vi) and as such contributions are deductible as described therein.